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Oriel High School Twitter Assignment

Physical Education

Mr R Ashley – rashley@oriel.w-sussex.sch.uk 

 

Deputy Subject Leader

Miss H Burgess – hburgess@oriel.w-sussex.sch.uk

 

Teaching Staff

Miss M Vickers – mvickers@oriel.w-sussex.sch.uk

Mr T Freeman – tfreeman@oriel.w-sussex.sch.uk

Mr O Svoboda – osvoboda@oriel.w-sussex.sch.uk

Miss P Taylor – ptaylor11@oriel.w-sussex.sch.uk

Mrs A Carr – acarr2@oriel.w-sussex.sch.uk

Mr T Matthews – tmatthews7@oriel.w-sussex.sch.uk

Mr M Hurst – mhurst@oriel.w-sussex.sch.uk

Ms S Madden – smadden@oriel.w-sussex.sch.uk

Introduction

Sport and physical activity is an important aspect to life at Oriel High School. We are fortunate to have outstanding facilities on site including extensive fields, an all weather pitch, hard courts, sports hall, gymnasium, dance studio, fitness suite and a dedicated classroom for theory teaching.

Every year Oriel High School competes in numerous local and regional competitions with considerable success. There is an extensive programme of extra curricular sports and physical activity clubs which are staffed by members of the PE team and other members of the school teaching staff.

Curriculum

Oriel High School delivers a high-quality physical education curriculum that enables all pupils to enjoy and succeed in many kinds of physical activity focussing on the following four National Curriculum for PE Key Concepts:

  • Competance
  • Performance
  • Creativity
  • Healthy Active Lifestyles

All students experience a range of activities in blocks of six lessons in a carousel arrangement and their progress is regularly assessed against the National Curriculum for PE Key Processes:

  • Developing skills in physical activity
  • Making and applying decisions
  • Developing physical and mental capacity
  • Evaluating and improving
  • Making informed choices about healthy, active lifestyles

Key Stage 3

Students in Year 7-9 all take part in four hours of curriculum PE per fortnight (usually two hours per week) experiencing the following activities, arranged in blocks of six lessons.

  • Athletics
  • Badminton
  • Basketball
  • Cricket
  • Dance
  • Football
  • Gymnastics
  • Health and Fitness
  • Hockey
  • Netball
  • Outdoor and Adventurous Activities
  • Rounders
  • Rugby
  • Softball
  • Stoolball
  • Table Tennis
  • Trampolining
  • Volleyball
  • Key Stage 4

Students in Year 10 and 11 all take part in two hours of curriculum PE per fortnight (usually one hour per week). Students can also opt to take part in an additional two hours per fortnight by opting for the Core PE Plus pathway in which they can study for a BTEC Sport Award, Level 2 Sports Leaders Award or simply an additional two hours of curriculum PE.

During their PE lessons, students take an increasing role in their learning experience, choosing activities from the following, each arranged in blocks of six lessons.

  • Badminton
  • Basketball
  • Football
  • Health and Fitness
  • Hockey
  • Netball
  • Rounders
  • Rugby
  • Softball
  • Stoolball
  • Table Tennis
  • Trampolining
  • Volleyball

GCSE PE

Students in Year 10 and 11 can opt for the Edexcel GCSE PE course. The course is delivered during five lessons per fortnight (usually three practical and two theory lessons) over two years.

Theory lesson topics:

  • Healthy, active lifestyles and how they could benefit you
  • Influences on your healthy, active lifestyle
  • Exercise and fitness as part of your healthy, active lifestyle
  • Physical activity as part of your healthy, active lifestyle
  • Your personal health and wellbeing
  • Physical activity and your healthy mind and body
  • A healthy, active lifestyle and your cardiovascular system
  • A healthy, active lifestyle and your respiratory system
  • A healthy, active lifestyle and your muscular system
  • A healthy, active lifestyle and your skeletal system

Practical lesson activities:

  • Badminton
  • Netball
  • Volleyball
  • Table Tennis
  • Basketball
  • Fitness
  • Athletics
  • Rounders
  • Personal Survival

Students can also be assessed in a wide range of practical activities that they take part in outside of lesson times at extra-curricular and outside of school clubs. Students have recently been assessed in the skiing, karate, swimming, diving, hockey, horse riding, gymnastics, kayaking and climbing activities in this way.

Assessment

1 ½ hour written exam (Year 11) – 40% of final grade
Four highest assessed practical activities and analysis of practical performance – 60% of final grade
For further details, please refer to the course specification.

BTEC Sport Level 2

Students in Year 10 and 11 can opt for the Edexcel BTEC Sport course. The course is delivered during five lessons per fortnight (usually three practical and two theory lessons) over two years.

During these lessons, students study the following coursework units:

  • Unit 1: Fitness Testing and Training
  • Unit 2: Practical Sport
  • Unit 7: Planning and Leading Sports Activities
  • Unit 11: Development of Personal Fitness

Assessment

Assessment on this course is ongoing and is purely coursework based; students complete a number of assignments for each of the above units.

For further details, please refer to the course specification

Key Stage 5

A Level PE

Students in Year 12 and 13 can opt for the OCR A Leve PE course; students can study this course at AS or A2 Level.

Theory Units:

AS (Year One)

  • Section A: Anatomy and Physiology
  • Section B: Acquiring Movement Skills
  • Section C: Socio-Cultural Studies relating to participation in physical activity

A2 (Year Two)

  • Section A: Sports Psychology
  • Section B: Exercise and Sports Physiology
  • Section C: Historical Studies

Assessment

Theory content: 65% of the final grade (60% at AS and 70% at A2).

Practical content: 35% of the final grade (40% at AS and 30% at A2).

During the first year (AS), practical assessment comprises two chosen activities. During the second year (A2), practical assessment comprises one chosen activity.

In both the AS and A2 year, students are also required to complete a piece of coursework in which they are required to evaluate and plan for the improvement of performance (EPIP). This will be a recorded detailed response on a performance.

For further details, please refer to the course specification.

BTEC Sport Level 3

Students in Year 12 and 13 can choose to opt for the Edexcel BTEC Sport course.

During these lessons, students study the following coursework units:

  • Unit 1: Principles of Anatomy and Physiology in Sport
  • Unit 2: The Physiology of Fitness
  • Unit 4: Fitness Training and Programming
  • Unit 5: Sports Coaching
  • Unit 7: Fitness Testing for Sport and Exercise
  • Unit 8: Practical Team Sports
  • Unit 11: Sports Nutrition
  • Unit 17: Psychology for Sports Performance
  • Unit 18: Sports Injuries
  • Unit 21: Sport and Exercise Massage
  • Unit 42: Research Investigation in Sport and Exercise Sciences

Assessment

Assessment on this course is ongoing and is purely coursework based; students complete a number of assignments for each of the above units.

For further details, please refer to the course specification.

Theory Units:

AS (Year One)

  • Section A: Anatomy and Physiology
  • Section B: Acquiring Movement Skills
  • Section C: Socio-Cultural Studies relating to participation in physical activity

A2 (Year Two)

  • Section A: Sports Psychology
  • Section B: Exercise and Sports Physiology
  • Section C: Historical Studies

Assessment

Theory content: 65% of the final grade (60% at AS and 70% at A2).

Practical content: 35% of the final grade (40% at AS and 30% at A2).

During the first year (AS), practical assessment comprises two chosen activities. During the second year (A2), practical assessment comprises one chosen activity.

In both the AS and A2 year, students are also required to complete a piece of coursework in which they are required to evaluate and plan for the improvement of performance (EPIP). This will be a recorded detailed response on a performance.

For further details, please refer to the course specification.

BTEC Sport Level 3

Students in Year 12 and 13 can choose to opt for the Edexcel BTEC Sport course.

During these lessons, students study the following coursework units:

  • Unit 1: Principles of Anatomy and Physiology in Sport
  • Unit 2: The Physiology of Fitness
  • Unit 4: Fitness Training and Programming
  • Unit 5: Sports Coaching
  • Unit 7: Fitness Testing for Sport and Exercise
  • Unit 8: Practical Team Sports
  • Unit 11: Sports Nutrition
  • Unit 17: Psychology for Sports Performance
  • Unit 18: Sports Injuries
  • Unit 21: Sport and Exercise Massage
  • Unit 42: Research Investigation in Sport and Exercise Sciences

 

Assessment

Assessment on this course is ongoing and is purely coursework based; students complete a number of assignments for each of the above units.

For further details, please refer to the course specification.

Sports Day Winners – Role of Honour 

2005 – Australasia
2006 – Australasia
2007 – Americas
2008 – Australasia
2009 – Australasia
2010 – Australasia
2011 – Africa
2012 – Africa
2013 – Africa
2014 – Australasia
2015 – Americas
2016 – Americas
2017 – Africa

 

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