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Essays On Marguerite Duras

"The Lover" By Marguerite Duras Essay

As a stunningly beautiful work of art, "The Lover", by Marguerite Duras, realistically and profoundly exposes the astonishing harmonization and clashing dissonance of love, sexuality and antagonism, memory and forgetfulness, emotions of happiness and dolefulness, and certitude of being desired. Memoirs of Marguerite Duras, as a reworking of the childhood in Indochina, intensely flowed out from her heart, artistically delineated into her novel and inextricably, bounded together and entwined with the readers. Not only does the narrative story open up by the ferry crossing the Mekong River, but, at the end, reiteratively, it is also closed by the ocean crossing back to Paris, France. Probably, in the novel, like the traversal passing the water, the borders and boundaries are, constantly, crossed, moreover, particularly, by retelling the story itself and repeating the memories, Marguerite Duras crosses her frontiers over and over again.

"The repetition of situation, events, memories, and words abounds in Duras texts. This repetition seems to emphasize the changing, unstable aspect of memory and language and move the readers to question his or her own memory and examine the dynamics of forgetting…It is a remembering that destroys memory and leads to a new memory, which can replace the last only fleetingly and without substance…a refusal of convention or disguise, as a unity of thought and will, life and appearance" _ Carol Hoffman. By repetition of the memories, Duras does not only cross her borders in the novel again, but she also lives and recreates the unforgettable love in the different historical setting in which she takes the role as both the insider and the outsider.

The unforgettable and denial love of the white young girl with the Chinese man thoroughly shows the crossing of the geography, race, culture, and sexual borders and boundaries. First of all, at the first time making love with the Chinese lover, with the sexual unconsciousness, channeling from pain to pleasure, the young girl lost virginity which is the precious frontier between an innocent girl and a woman ." And, weeping, he makes love. At first, pain. And then the pain is possessed in its turn, changed, slowly drawn away, borne toward pleasure, clasped to it". Crossing the border between girl and woman after making love with the Chinese lover, she is, moreover, conscious of her desire for the lover "He smells pleasantly of English cigarettes, expensive perfume, honey, his skin has taken on the scent of silk, the fruity smell of...

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"Porphyria's Lover" by Robert Browning - Questions and answers concerning the key aspects of the poem

1817 words - 7 pages Question 1: Describe the personality of the lover. Support with evidence.As the poem "Porphyria's Lover" progresses, the lover establishes a distinctly repulsive character for himself. It is evident that this man has a sadistic personality, accompanied by a twisted sense of perception that is fueled by a gnawing insecurity within his own...

Analysis of the novel "Lady Chatterley's Lover" by D. H. Lawrence

5263 words - 21 pages Was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, literary critic and painter who published as D. H. Lawrence. Born in England on September 11, 1885, D.H. Lawrence is regarded as one of the most influential writers of the 20th century. Lawrence published many novels and poetry volumes during his lifetime, including...

Comparison between the text, The Most Dangerous Game by Richard Connell and the poem, Porphyria's Lover by Robert Browning.

2437 words - 10 pages The short story "The Most Dangerous Game" by Richard Connell and the poem "Porphyria's Lover" by Robert Browning, both show the concept of relationships. The short story "The Most Dangerous Game", shows a relationship between two hunters, one very well known to the public and the other who is not very well known, but has a enormous amount of skill, while...

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

1276 words - 5 pages Question Four Throughout her life, Marguerite experiences many different situations and people that all contribute to the way she grows up and the person she becomes. Despite some of her tragic circumstances, she learns a lot growing up, mainly because of the African-American women in her life who teach her all different life lessons. In I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Marguerite gets to absorb teachings from her mother (Vivian), Mrs. Bertha...

"Ourika" by Claire de Duras

543 words - 2 pages Times were very harsh for the fortunate. The Enlightenment era encouraged many ideals into existence. Duras's accomplishment truly meant something very special. It is very interesting that having told her story in her salon, she decided to write it and later publish the...

The Voice of Victorian “Longing like Despair”

2106 words - 8 pages Matthew Arnold’s Poetry: The Voice of Victorian “Longing like Despair” John Stuart Mill defined the Victorian Era as “an age of transition”, where “Mankind will not be led by their old maxims, nor by their old guides.” Other contemporary minds saw in this transition the main source of profound intellectual and moral confusion, “that may validly be described as a crisis of personal identity.” (R. A. Forsyth) The poet and Victorian literary...

The Importance of Posture and Gesture for the Performer in Relation to Greta Garbo From Camille

2598 words - 10 pages The Importance of Posture and Gesture for the Performer in Relation to Greta Garbo From Camille Camille, created in 1936, is universally acknowledged as one of the most romantically atmospheric productions of al time. The film begins with the scene being set as we are shown “the gay half-world of Paris, the gentlemen of the day met the girls of the moment at certain theatres, balls and gambling clubs, where the code ...

An Analysis of Love Countering Molestation in Walker’s The Color Purple and Angelou’s I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings

2456 words - 10 pages A child, male or female, who have been molested by anyone, affects that child physically and mentally. Anger, depression, self loathing and many more mental problems affects a child who have been sexually abused; this takes away the innocence and childhood of a child. For a child to overcome these struggles, they must receive support from someone or a loved one. For a recovery close to a complete recovery, the child should obtain this support...

Race Relations in I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou

781 words - 3 pages Race Relations in I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou The reasons listed by the censors for banning I Know Why the Cage Bird Sings do not explain the widespread controversy around the novel. There is reason to believe that the question of the novel is in its poignant portrayal of race relations. This explains why the novel has been most controversial in the South, where racial tension is historically worst, and where the novel is...

Slings And Arrows

1357 words - 5 pages Slings and Arrows The social climate from the 1930s to the 1950s was at best tempestuous for the African American community. The depression accounted for 26 percent unemployment of black males and propagated the "Don't buy when you can't work" protests. The unrest was certainly not limited to the job market though. In 1934, the Scottsboro trials created a political and social storm out of crime that never actually occurred. True...

Yellow Journalism

1411 words - 6 pages “Journalism without a moral position is impossible. Every journalist is a moralist, It’s absolutely unavoidable. A journalist is someone who looks at the world and the way it works, someone who takes a close look at things everyday and reports what she sees, someone who represents the world, the event, for others. She cannot do her work without judging what she sees” quoted by Marguerite Duras. When looking at things there could be a hidden...

One of my favorite novels of the past few years is Andrés Neuman’s Traveler of the Century, an ambitious “total novel” that is many things: a love story, a murder mystery, and, most of all, a novel of ideas. While his latest, Talking to Ourselves, is much more brief and intimate, it is no less moving and intelligent. And while Traveller was set in an imaginary place, Talking to Ourselves is grounded in our reality, alternating between the voices of a father, mother, and son as they all deal with the father’s illness. None of them dares to express the complete the truth to the other two; instead, it’s up to us to put the pieces together. As the mother, Elena, expresses near the end, “Let’s be honest. All honesty is a little posthumous.” —Justin Alvarez

When I last left America, an airport official confiscated Dos Passos’s USA trilogy to reduce my hand-luggage; I learnt my lesson and flew back in bearing only one light paperback, Open City by Teju Cole. As I read it over three months, its narrator, Julius, walked through the same streets of New York (then Brussels and back to New York) in a headspace James Wood astutely calls “productive alienation,” nourishing common encounters on the street with memories (of his father’s funeral, Nigeria, schoolmates illnesses, the first illicit consumption of a pornographic magazine or a Coca Cola). His narrative is besieged by loss, and calibrated, in the end, to omit rather than include. Cole’s novel is paradoxical, “turned in on itself” as Manhattan itself is: “water was a kind of embarrassing secret, the unloved daughter, neglected, while the parks were doted on, fussed over, overused.” —Lucie Elven

“Years and years and years ago, when I was a boy, when there were wolves in Wales, and birds the color of red-flannel petticoats whisked past the harp-shaped hills, when we sang and wallowed all night and day in caves that smelt like Sunday afternoons in damp front farmhouse parlors, and we chased, with the jawbones of deacons, the English and the bears, before the motor car, before the wheel, before the duchess-faced horse when we rode the daft and happy hills bareback, it snowed and it snowed.” If one story conjures the youthful enchantment of tossing snowballs at neighborhood cats and building snowmen, of chimneys emitting plumes of smoke, surely it must be Dylan Thomas’s A Child’s Christmas in Wales. Published in a slim blue volume by New Directions, this comic tale of family and friends of Christmas past is sure to delight; I joyfully revisit Thomas’s word-drunk reverie each year. —Adam Winters

This week I’ve been reading the Barbara Bray translation of Marguerite Duras’s L’amant (The Lover). On more than one occasion I found myself reading it aloud, not just to hear the pleasant tensions of translation, but to also listen to the heartache of Duras’s language. Against the backdrop of prewar Indochina, Duras paints the most tempestuous of love affairs. Yet amidst the novel’s unabated despair—the affaire de coeur, the family torn asunder by poverty, the mother’s madness, the young girl’s insatiable desire for another young girl’s body—shines a beacon of hope: the narrator’s inexorable determination to become a writer. “I’m still part of the family, it’s there I live to the exclusion of everywhere else. It’s in its aridity, it’s terrible harshness, its malignancy, that I’m most deeply sure of myself, at the heart of my essential certainty, the certainty that later on I’ll be a writer.” To second Maxine Hong Kingston’s remarks in her Introduction to the novel, “The Lover is a story about a girl and a woman becoming an artist.” —Caitlin Youngquist

Sportswriter Joe Palmer once warned that those of us who’ve spent time at the races may develop an “unreasonable fondness for certain places,” and if you’ve ever been to Aqueduct—the neon lights, the cinderblock walls, the geriatric thugs crowding the parimutuel windows—no doubt you’re familiar with the sentiment. A certain charm, one might say, if one were drunk on Wild Turkey—and yet the kids have not caught on, or at least not yet. The New York Racing Association recently commissioned thirteen street artists to liven up those cinderblock walls, resulting in several murals diverse in style, size and subject matter (including portraiture based on archival photos supplied by the NYRA). On a recent afternoon the grizzled throngs were still in evidence, though I also spied a few fresh-faced twenty-somethings looking only slightly ill at ease. Aqueduct’s current meet runs through December 31. —Abby Gibbon